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  • Electro-Motion is always proactive in scheduling and completing preventative maintenance. Their follow up and documentation is excellent. They are very responsive to my requests for additional information and never complain when I need emergency service.

    Dave Wiggins
    Facility Manager
    Sacrum Services

    Does Your Emergency Generator Have a Remote Manual Stop Station?

    April 24, 2015

    Fire marshals have recently stepped up enforcement of the NFPA110, Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems requirement for a remote manual stop station for all emergency generators.

    NFPA110, 5.6.5.6 states: "All installations shall have a remote manual stop station of a type to prevent inadvertent or unintentional operation located outside the room housing the prime mover, where so installed, or elsewhere on the premises where the prime mover is located outside the building." This is a requirement for ALL generators.

    Electro-Motion has experience in installing remote manual stop stations for our customers upon request. Be proactive, get one installed now, before your next fire inspection visit. Call Electro-Motion today at 650-321-6169 for a quote.


    The Weakest Link in Your Emergency Power System

    April 2, 2015

    The #1 reason for service calls is because the generator did not start.

    The #1 reason the generator did not start is due to a battery system failure.

    And simply put, if your unit doesn't start, it can't perform. Therefore, your starting system (consisting of the battery, battery charger, starter, starter solenoid, cables, etc.) is of critical importance to maintaining dependable and reliable performance. And among these starting system elements, the battery is the most important. It also happens to be the item most likely to cause trouble.

    Under ideal conditions, a battery can last 4-5 years or longer. Unfortunately most starting batteries work under average-to-poor environmental, application, and maintenance conditions. This shortens their life considerably. NFPA110, Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems, 2013 edition states that "it is recommended that lead-acid batteries be replaced every 24 to 30 months." Based on our experience, we recommend replacing small batteries every 2 years and large batteries every 3 years, using an industrial-grade battery specifically designed for standby generator duty. Remember, this isn't like waiting to replace your car battery until it fails. Wait that long and you risk not having emergency power when you desperately need it. Replacing your batteries every 2-3 years is the "cheapest insurance" you can buy to make sure your emergency generator is dependable and starts when needed.


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